The Travels of Tug 44


Long-Eared Owl






January 2019 - This is the only time I have managed to photo a Long-Eared Owl in the wild ... in the Fort Edward grasslands. This was on a dark & dreary day, and that is when one can occasionally spot a nocturnal Owl in daytime. It was sitting in a tree near where several Short-Eared Owls normally roost, they are roughly the same size, and are known to roost together.   high-res



The Long-Eared Owl turned and scanned the hay field, and then I was distracted for just a moment and the Owl was gone. It was in view only 30 seconds.   high-res



The Long-Eared Owl is similar to its lighter-colored short-eared cousin. They have about a 3 foot wingspread. They are in Fort Edward but are rarely if ever seen because they are nocturnal and extremely shy so they tend to roost in forested areas beyond the hay fields. I met this one at the Winter Raptor Fest at our local Washington County Fairgrounds.   high-res



The Long-Eared Owl, like most owls, can turn his head all the way backwards as in this photo. And they have a ring around their face of short stiff feathers, which directs sounds toward the ears which are hidden under the feathers. Sort of a listening device.   high-res

The Long-Eared Owl, a very shy night hunter.




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